Tulare County (/tʊˈlɛəri/ (listen) tuu-LAIR-ee) is a county in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 473,117.[6] The county seat is Visalia.[7] The county is named for Tulare Lake, once the largest freshwater lake west of the Great Lakes. Drained for agricultural development, the site is now in Kings County, which was created in 1893 from the western portion of the formerly larger Tulare County.

Tulare County comprises the Visalia-Porterville, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is located south of Fresno, spanning from the San Joaquin Valley east to the Sierra Nevada.

Sequoia National Park is located in the county, as is part of Kings Canyon National Park, in its northeast corner (shared with Fresno County), and part of Mount Whitney, on its eastern border (shared with Inyo County). As of the 2020 census, the population was 473,117, up from 442,179 at the 2010 census.

History

Road sign, 1920

The land was occupied for thousands of years by the Yokuts. Beginning in the eighteenth century, Spain established missions to colonize California and convert the American Indians to Christianity. Comandante Pedro Fages, while hunting for deserters in the Central Valley in 1772, discovered a great lake surrounded by marshes and filled with rushes; he named it Los Tules (the tules). It is from this lake that the county derives its name. The root of the name Tulare is found in the Nahuatl word tullin, designating cattail or similar reeds.

In 1805, 1806 and again in 1816, the Spanish out of Mission San Luis Obispo explored Lake Tulare.[8] Bubal was a native village located on the Western side of Lake Tulare. In 1816, Fr. Luis Martinez of Mission San Luis Obispo arrived at Bubal with soldiers and armed Christian Northern Chumash pressuring the people to send their children for baptism at his mission on the coast. Conflict broke out, and Martinez's party burned Bubal to the ground, destroying the cache of food harvested for the winter.[9] Although Bubal's relationship with the Christian Salinans under Fr. Cabot at Mission San Miguel was better, between 1816 and 1834, Bubal was a center of native resistance. The marshes around Lake Tulare were impenetrable by Spanish horses, which gave the Yokuts a military advantage. At one point, the Spanish considered building a presidio with 100 soldiers at Bubal to control the resistance, but that never came to pass. The Spanish called the natives of the area Tulareños, and before 1816 and after 1834, they were incorporated into Mission San Miguel and Mission San Luis Obispo.[9]

After Mexico achieved independence, it continued to rule California. After the Mexican Cession and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, the area became part of the United States. Tulare County was soon formed from parts of Mariposa County only four years later in 1852. There were two early attempts to split off a new Buena Vista County in 1855 and Coso County in 1864, but both failed. Parts of the county's territory were given to Fresno County in 1856, to Kern County and Inyo County in 1866 and to Kings County in 1893.

The infectious disease Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is named after Tulare County.

In 1908 Colonel Allen Allensworth and associates founded Allensworth as a black farming community. They intended to develop a place where African Americans could thrive free of white discrimination. It was the only community in California founded, financed and governed by African Americans. While its first years were highly successful, the community encountered environmental problems from dropping water tables which eventually caused it to fail. Today the historic area is preserved as the Colonel Allensworth State Historic Park, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,839 square miles (12,530 km2), of which 4,823 square miles (12,490 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2), or 0.3%, is water.[10]

Adjacent counties

Mount Whitney is located on the Tulare–Inyo county line.

Lakes

Columbine Lake

Rivers

Parks

National protected areas

Sequoia National Park

Sequoia National Park is located within Tulare County.

Sequoia National Park is a national park in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of Visalia. It was established in 1890 as the second U.S. national park, after Yellowstone. The park spans 404,051 acres (1,635.14 km2). Encompassing a vertical relief of nearly 13,000 feet (3,962 m), the park contains among its natural resources the highest point in the contiguous 48 United States, Mount Whitney, at 14,505 feet (4,421 m) above sea level. The park is south of and contiguous with Kings Canyon National Park; the two are administered by the National Park Service as one unit, called Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

Flora

Tulare County is rich in native plant species due in part to a diversity in habitats, including creeks, rivers, hills, and mountains. Native plants include incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens), valley oak (Quercus lobata), California bay (Umbellularia californica), manzanita (Arctostaphylos manzanita), Salvia spathacea, mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus betuloides), milkweed (Asclepias speciosa), Epilobium cleistogamum, monkeyflower (Mimulus), Penstemon, California melic (Melica californica), and deer grass (Muhlenbergia rigens).[11]

Government and policing

Administration

Tulare County is a general law county under the California Constitution. That is, it does not have a county charter. The county is governed by a five-member Board of Supervisors. Supervisors are elected by districts for four-year terms. There are no term limits in effect. The Chairman and Vice-Chairman are elected annually by the Board of Supervisors from among its members.

Sheriff

The Tulare County Sheriff provides court protection, county jail operation, patrol and detective functions in the unincorporated areas of the county. Incorporated towns have municipal police departments or contract with the Sheriff for their police operations.

Transportation

Major highways

Public transportation

Tulare County Area Transit (TCaT) provides a intracounty bus service linking the population centers. One TCaT route connects to Delano in Kern County.

The cities of Tulare, Porterville, and Visalia have their own local intracity bus services.

Greyhound and Orange Belt Stages provide long-distance, intercity bus service outside the county.

Airports

The Porterville Municipal Airport, located 3 nautical miles (3.5 mi; 5.6 km) from Downtown Porterville, has very limited commercial passenger service with WestAir. The airport offers general aviation to the public; it is also home to Porterville Air Attack Base on the south part of the airport. The Visalia Municipal Airport is a city-owned airport for the city of Visalia, California. Mefford Field is a city-owned general aviation airport located in Tulare.

The nearest full-operation commercial airports are Bakersfield's Meadows Field Airport to the south, and Fresno's Fresno Yosemite International Airport to the north.

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense, as of 2019.

Cities by population and crime rates

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18604,638
18704,533−2.3%
188011,281148.9%
189024,574117.8%
190018,375−25.2%
191035,44092.9%
192059,03166.6%
193077,44231.2%
1940107,15238.4%
1950149,26439.3%
1960168,40312.8%
1970188,32211.8%
1980245,73830.5%
1990311,92126.9%
2000368,02118.0%
2010442,17920.2%
2020473,1177.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790-1960[16] 1900-1990[17]
1990-2000[18] 2010[19] 2020[20]

2020 census

Tulare County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[19] Pop 2020[20] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 143,935 125,022 32.55% 26.43%
Black or African American alone (NH) 5,497 5,332 1.24% 1.13%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 3,323 3,458 0.75% 0.73%
Asian alone (NH) 14,204 15,997 3.21% 3.38%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 370 511 0.08% 0.11%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 641 2,132 0.14% 0.45%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 6,144 10,770 1.39% 2.28%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 268,065 309,895 60.62% 65.50%
Total 442,179 473,117 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

The 2020 United States Census reported that Tulare County had a population of 473,117 and the population was spread out, with 31.0% under the age of 18, 69.0% from 18 to 64, 6.5% from 65 to 74, 3.2% from 75 to 84 and 1.4% who were 85 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years.[12]

The racial makeup of Tulare County including Hispanics was 186,255 (39.4%) White, 6,668 (1.4%) African American, 10,645 (2.2%) Native American, 17,194 (3.6%) Asian, 723 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 165,230 (34.9%) from other races, and 86,402 (18.2%) from two or more races. There were 309,895 people (65.5%) of Hispanic or Latino origin, of any race.[21] 3.7% were of German, 3.2% English, 2.8% Irish, 2.4% Portuguese and 2.3% American ancestry according to Census 2020. 48.7% spoke English, 47.4% Spanish and 1.0% Indo-European as their first language.

There were 144,109 households, out of which 45.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a male householder with no spouse present, 24.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 20.8% were non-families, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.57.[12]

There were 150,652 household units, and 141,987 occupied housing units in the county. The population density was 98.1 people per square mile (37.9/km2).[22]

The median income for a household in the county was $57,692, and the median income for a family was $53,330. The per capita income for the county was $23,096.[23] About 18.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.0% of those under age 18 and 13.8% of those age 65 or over.

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census reported that Tulare County had a population of 442,179. The racial makeup of Tulare County was 265,618 (60.1%) White, 7,196 (1.6%) African American, 6,993 (1.6%) Native American, 15,176 (3.4%) Asian, 509 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 128,263 (29.0%) from other races, and 18,424 (4.2%) from two or more races. There were 268,065 people (60.6%) of Hispanic or Latino origin, of any race.[32]

2000 Census

As of the census[33] of 2000, there were 368,021 people, 110,385 households, and 87,093 families residing in the county. The population density was 76 people per square mile (29/km2). There were 119,639 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 58.1% White, 1.6% Black or African American, 1.6% Native American, 3.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 30.8% from other races, and 4.6% from two or more races. 50.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 6.2% were of American, 5.7% German and 5.0% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 56.3% spoke English, 38.9% Spanish and 1.1% Portuguese as their first language.

There were 110,385 households, out of which 44.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.1% were non-families. 17.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.28 and the average family size was 3.67.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 33.8% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,983, and the median income for a family was $36,297. Males had a median income of $30,892 versus $24,589 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,006. About 18.8% of families and 23.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.6% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

Crime statistics

(reported by the sheriff's office or county police)[34]

  • Murders: 30
  • Rapes: 40
  • Robberies: 87
  • Assaults: 411
  • Burglaries: 1328
  • Thefts: 2117
  • Auto thefts: 11

Metropolitan Statistical Area

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Tulare County as the Visalia-Porterville, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[35] The United States Census Bureau ranked the Visalia-Porterville, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 111th most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[36]

The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the Visalia-Porterville, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area as a component of the more extensive Visalia-Porterville-Hanford, CA Combined Statistical Area,[35] the 80th most populous combined statistical area and the 92nd most populous primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[36][37]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Tulare County is the 7th largest county in California by total area.[12]

Politics

Voter registration statistics

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

Tulare is a strongly Republican county in presidential and congressional elections. The last Democratic candidate for president to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964. In the 2016 presidential election, Republican candidate and overall winner, Donald Trump, won Tulare by a 9.39% margin of victory, the closest margin of victory for a Republican in the county since Richard Nixon's 8.37% margin in 1960. The Republican advantage narrowed further in the 2020 presidential election when Donald Trump won the county by a 7.82% margin despite losing nationally to Joe Biden, the closest margin of victory for a Republican in the county since Dwight D. Eisenhower's 5.33% margin in 1956.

United States presidential election results for Tulare County, California[39]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 77,579 52.82% 66,105 45.00% 3,201 2.18%
2016 58,299 51.09% 47,585 41.70% 8,218 7.20%
2012 56,956 56.24% 41,752 41.22% 2,571 2.54%
2008 59,765 56.64% 43,634 41.35% 2,126 2.01%
2004 65,399 66.15% 32,494 32.87% 967 0.98%
2000 54,070 60.20% 33,006 36.75% 2,742 3.05%
1996 46,272 53.90% 32,669 38.06% 6,905 8.04%
1992 40,482 45.71% 31,188 35.22% 16,883 19.07%
1988 46,891 59.61% 30,711 39.04% 1,067 1.36%
1984 51,066 63.88% 28,065 35.11% 812 1.02%
1980 41,317 58.32% 25,155 35.51% 4,374 6.17%
1976 31,864 54.52% 25,551 43.72% 1,027 1.76%
1972 36,048 59.93% 21,775 36.20% 2,327 3.87%
1968 29,314 52.17% 22,180 39.47% 4,695 8.36%
1964 22,527 39.83% 33,974 60.08% 51 0.09%
1960 29,456 53.97% 24,887 45.60% 239 0.44%
1956 26,051 52.50% 23,407 47.17% 160 0.32%
1952 30,108 57.07% 22,208 42.10% 437 0.83%
1948 18,414 46.98% 19,681 50.22% 1,097 2.80%
1944 16,005 49.30% 16,221 49.97% 238 0.73%
1940 15,414 42.85% 20,129 55.96% 428 1.19%
1936 8,624 30.78% 18,956 67.66% 435 1.55%
1932 8,066 32.27% 15,631 62.53% 1,302 5.21%
1928 12,057 63.76% 6,635 35.09% 218 1.15%
1924 9,484 50.79% 3,425 18.34% 5,765 30.87%
1920 9,136 61.26% 4,837 32.43% 941 6.31%
1916 6,845 43.96% 7,299 46.87% 1,428 9.17%
1912 73 0.72% 4,293 42.31% 5,781 56.97%
1908 2,742 47.95% 2,329 40.73% 647 11.32%
1904 2,221 48.61% 1,643 35.96% 705 15.43%
1900 1,755 41.41% 2,246 53.00% 237 5.59%
1896 1,410 33.80% 2,673 64.07% 89 2.13%
1892 1,984 31.96% 2,613 42.09% 1,611 25.95%
1888 2,275 43.82% 2,637 50.79% 280 5.39%
1884 1,268 40.15% 1,691 53.55% 199 6.30%
1880 917 38.71% 1,306 55.13% 146 6.16%


In the United States House of Representatives, Tulare County is split between three congressional districts:[40]

In the California State Senate, it is split between three legislative districts:[42]

In the California State Assembly, the county is split between the 23rd Assembly District, represented by Republican Jim Patterson, and the 26th Assembly District, represented by Republican Devon Mathis.[43]

Economy

The dairy industry, with sales of milk products, brings in the most revenue for the county, typically more than US$1 billion a year annually. Oranges, grapes, and cattle-related commodities also earn hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

In 2001, Tulare became the most productive county in the U.S. in terms of agricultural revenues, at US$3.5 billion annually. It surpassed Fresno County's US$3.2 billion, which had held the top spot for over two decades. Due to the importance of agriculture in the county as well as its location in the state, since 1968 the city of Tulare has been the site of the annual World Ag Expo,[44] the world's largest agricultural exposition.

Minor league sports teams, such as the baseball Visalia Rawhide of the class-A level California League (an affiliate to the Arizona Diamondbacks), two teams of the Minor League Football Association in Tulare and Visalia, and four teams of the Central California Basketball League based in Porterville, attract many residents and add to the amenities in the county.[citation needed]

Top employers

According to the county's 2020 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[45] the top employers in the county are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 County of Tulare 5,106
2 Visalia Unified School District 3,355
3 Kaweah Delta Medical Center 2,000
4 Sierra View District Hospital 1,800
5 Ruiz Food Production, Inc 1,800
6 Wal-Mart Distribution Center 1,692
7 Porterville Developmental Center 1,173
8 College of the Sequoias 1,160
9 Jostens 720
10 City of Visalia 653

Utilities and infrastructure

Electricity service in Tulare County is provided by Southern California Edison and PG&E. Gas is provided by SoCalGas and PG&E. TV and Internet service is provided by several companies, such as Spectrum, DISH, DirecTV and HughesNET.

Communities

Cities

Census designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Indian reservation

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of Tulare County.[46]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2020 Census)
1 Visalia City 154.048
2 Tulare City 77.101
3 Porterville City 77.681
4 Dinuba City 34.855
5 Lindsay City 17.729
6 Farmersville City 10.397
7 Exeter City 10,334
8 Orosi CDP 8.329
9 Earlimart CDP 7.679
10 East Porterville CDP 5.549
11 Woodlake City 7.419
12 Cutler CDP 4.480
13 Ivanhoe CDP 4.468
t-14 Pixley CDP 3.828
t-14 Terra Bella CDP 2.910
15 Goshen CDP 4.968
16 Richgrove CDP 2.358
17 Strathmore CDP 2.830
18 Tipton CDP 2.519
19 Poplar-Cotton Center CDP 2.370
20 Three Rivers CDP 2.053
21 London CDP 1.518
22 Patterson Tract CDP 1.888
23 Woodville CDP 1.680
24 Teviston CDP 1.185
25 Matheny CDP 1.125
26 Tule River Reservation[47] AIAN 1.250
27 Alpaugh CDP 1,026
28 Plainview CDP 871
29 Springville CDP 967
30 Linnell Camp CDP 696
31 East Tulare Villa CDP 773
32 Sultana CDP 779
33 Traver CDP 731
34 Ducor CDP 616
35 West Goshen CDP 536
36 East Orosi CDP 423
37 Seville CDP 446
38 Allensworth CDP 531
39 Delft Colony CDP 412
40 Lindcove CDP 189
41 Tooleville CDP 286
42 Tonyville CDP 329
43 Lemon Cove CDP 298
44 Yettem CDP 201
45 Monson CDP 152
46 Pine Flat CDP 206
47 Rodriguez Camp CDP 133
48 El Rancho CDP 96
49 Waukena CDP 80
50 Camp Nelson CDP 106
51 Pierpoint CDP 59
52 Idlewild CDP 32
53 Panorama Heights CDP 44
54 California Hot Springs CDP 50
55 Hartland CDP 69
56 Kennedy Meadows CDP 58
57 Sugarloaf Saw Mill CDP 14
58 Ponderosa CDP 51
t-59 McClenney Tract CDP 15
t-59 Posey CDP 23
t-59 Sequoia Crest CDP 24
t-59 Sugarloaf Village CDP 7
60 Poso Park CDP 9
61 Wilsonia CDP 14
t-62 Cedar Slope CDP 10
t-62 Silver City CDP 0
t-62 Sugarloaf Mountain Park CDP 0

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  2. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  3. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  4. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References

  1. ^ "County Administrative Officer - CAO". County of Tulare. Archived from the original on February 9, 2015. Retrieved February 8, 2015.
  2. ^ "Eddie Valero, District 4 - Chairman - Board of Supervisors".
  3. ^ "Dennis Townsend, District 5 - Vice Chair - Board of Supervisors".
  4. ^ "County Supervisors - Board of Supervisors".
  5. ^ "Mount Whitney". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Tulare County, California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  8. ^ Cook, S. F. (1958). "Colonial Expeditions to the Interior of California Central Valley, 1800–1820" (PDF). Anthropological Records. 16 (6): 243, 245, 271. ISSN 0068-6336. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2020. Alt URL
  9. ^ a b Milliken, Randall; Johnson, John (2005). An ethnogeography of Salinan and Northern Chumash communities, 1769–1810. Davis, California: Far Western Anthropological Research Group. p. 22.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. ^ "Drought Tolerant Native Plants" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on October 9, 2011. Retrieved 2009-11-22.
  12. ^ a b c d e "2020 Geography Profile - Redistricting Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved December 5, 2021.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Offenses Known to Law Enforcement – California, 2019". Uniform Crime Reporting – Federal Bureau of Investigation. September 28, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ a b c d Crime in the United States, 2019, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2021-12-07.
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  19. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Tulare County, California". United States Census Bureau.
  20. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Tulare County, California". United States Census Bureau.
  21. ^ "Total Population - Decennial Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 5, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. ^ "2020 Census Population and Housing Map". US Census Bureau - Tableau Public. August 12, 2021. Retrieved December 5, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ "Census profile: Tulare County". Census Reporter. Retrieved December 5, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  25. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  26. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  27. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  28. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  29. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  30. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Data unavailable
  32. ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  33. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  34. ^ "city-data-Tulare_County-CA". analyzed data from numerous sources. Retrieved April 7, 2009.
  35. ^ a b "OMB Bulletin No. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013 – via National Archives.
  36. ^ a b "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on April 1, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  37. ^ "Table 2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on May 17, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p California Secretary of State. February 10, 2021 - Report of Registration Retrieved 2021-12-07.
  39. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved September 6, 2018.
  40. ^ "Counties by County and by District". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved September 24, 2014.
  41. ^ "California's 23rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  42. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Archived from the original on October 23, 2015. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  43. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Archived from the original on October 23, 2015. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  44. ^ "International Agri-Center / Tulare, CA". www.worldagexpo.com.
  45. ^ "2020FY COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT". County of Tulare, State of California. June 30, 2020. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved December 5, 2021.
  46. ^ Bureau, US Census. "Decennial Census by Decades". The United States Census Bureau.
  47. ^ [1][dead link]

Further reading

External links